Entering the Dream Gates: Robert Moss

In the last post we learned a bit about the fascinating life and work of Robert Moss.  In this post, we'll learn more about Robert and about his latest book—of poetry! In your book Dreamgates you describe several workshops in which there is an apparent connection between the star Sirius and the Ancient Egyptians.  Can you describe how you best understand the possibility of this connection? “I think that Egyptian initiates had a science of star travel, and that some of those elaborate temple-tombs were actually launch-pads and interdimensional gateways. In this tradition (as in that of the Dogon of Mai, who had charts showing Sirius B before astronomers could see it through a telescope) Sirius is the source of higher intelligence on this planet, and it was believed possible to return to that source through shamanic dream travel. In Dreamgates I describe a group journey I led to the intelligences of Sirius—identified by one of my inner guides by an...
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Seeing is Dreaming: Robert Moss

Robert Moss is a teacher and human being I much admire.  He is versed in mythology and folklore, symbolism and psychology, and Native American rituals and rites. His travels and teachings have led him around the world, and he is the author of nine books on dreaming, as well as three historical novels. There are few people I can think of who have led such a rich and connected life, and who dedicates time to sharing knowledge and life experience with others, particularly as related to dreams and dream material. Born in Australia, Robert survived not one, but three near-death experiences in childhood.  A former lecturer in ancient history at the Australian National University, Robert also is a best-selling novelist, poet, journalist and independent scholar.  He is the creator of Active Dreaming, an original synthesis of modern dreamwork and shamanism. From his audio series Dream Gates, he says: "I have become convinced that dreaming is one of the defining characteristics of human beings. In prehistoric times we...
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Synchronicity: Being in the Flow of Life

Each month, I send out a subscriber-only newsletter and I want to share with you a section of the last newsletter.  I include a Q&A that covers a wide range of topics  including writing, editing, metaphysics, astrology, and other similar info.  This month's Q&A was particular poignant, so I wanted to make it available here for you. Stephanie from San Francisco, California wrote: How do you explain synchronicities and what do they mean? What if I told you that your question is itself a synchronicity? Leading up to this newsletter I’ve been thinking about and wanting to write about co-creatorship. The mention of Sagittarius and the planet Jupiter, earlier, starts to discuss this. Not only that, in the second interview installment with M.J. Rose, she mentions near the end the idea of synchronicity as the term was coined and defined by Carl Jung. Bravo Stephanie for being in the flow!   Synchronicities are most often seen as 'coincidences' that appear when we do not expect...
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M.J. Rose on Writing, Reincarnation, and Aromas

In the last post we learned about M.J. Rose and her adventures in the publishing world. In this post, we'll learn more about her writing style and inspiration. What is the one thing that always puts you in the space or frame of mind to write when you’re working on a project—even if you’re not feeling particularly inspired? "I have a talisman for every book…an object that belongs to the main character. All I have to do is focus on it. Right now it’s an old silver and amethyst ring that I believe my character, a 16th century perfumer, wore on his forefinger all his life." How do you approach plot when you’re writing a new novel? Do you use an outline in your process? "I spend a long time on my main characters, creating scrapbooks for them filled with all the mementos of their life. I give about three months to this process not writing a word, but finding my characters in the...
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M.J. Rose on Books, Buzz, and Business

There are many contemporary writers that delve into interesting topics, but I believe few are as interesting as M.J. Rose. Her writing bridges the gaps between art and artifact, fiction and nonfiction. She weaves historical events with fictional characters, moves plot across and through multiple eras, and makes connections between eclectic and seemingly disparate things and people, to leave readers with a sense that everything is truly connected. M.J. is the international bestselling author of the novels:  Lip Service, In Fidelity, Flesh Tones, Sheet Music, Lying in Bed, The Halo Effect, The Delilah Complex, The Venus Fix, The Reincarnationist, The Memorist, The Hypnotist, and The Book of Lost Fragrances: A Novel of Suspense. She is also the co-author with Angela Adair Hoy of How To Publish and Promote Online, and with Doug Clegg of Buzz Your Book. Her newest novel Seduction, became available on May 7. She is a founding member and board member of International Thriller Writers and the founder of the first...
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Integrating the Shadow: The Light and The Darkness in Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan

In the early twentieth-century, when Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung parted ways, the future of psychoanalysis was unclear. Sure, Jung had presented academic papers to his peers and had volumes of journals and research, but his interest in the esoteric, astrology, the “occult,” the invisible, was well beyond his peers’ understanding of such subjects and how these subjects may relate to the study of clinical psychology. Darren Aronofsky has always been one of my favorite directors since his early beginnings with Pi and Requiem for a Dream.  The Fountain remains one of my favorite films of all time for many reasons, but when Black Swan debuted at the theater, I didn’t rush out to see it.  It came and left the big screen, won an Oscar, and still I had made no attempt to view the film. I knew that it would require attention, I knew it would have a profound effect upon its viewers, including me. I knew it would be intense and...
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More Fun with Sandy Florian

In the last post, we learned a bit about Sandy's work, got a sense of her creative writing style and learned a bit about her.  In this post, we'll learn whether Sandy  likes typewriters and black ink (among other things) in an A-Z list, and birthday prompt. For each items in the alphabetized list below, Sandy gave a  “yes” for  a thumbs up and “no” for a thumbs down—and a few answers in between. A.  James Joyce’s Ulysses – Yes B.  Magical realism – Yes C.  Catchy hybrid terms like “jeggings” – Haha! I had to look that one up. I’ll give that a double Yes. D.  The Chicago Manual of Style – Yes E.  Silent films – Yes F.  Harry Potter – I’m not sure. I haven’t read them. I probably should. I’ll say Yes because it turns kids on to literature. G.  The revision process – Yes H.  Perfectionism – Yes I.  Ink wells – As metaphors? Yes. As writing tools with plumes? No. Too sloppy. Too self-aware. J.  Using...
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Experimental Literature and the Work of Sandy Florian

Writing is a self-reflective and sometimes, self-reflexive process depending upon the subject matter. Great writing has the ability to transport readers to another place, time, or planet (or elsewhere) and instruct, inform, intrigue and enlighten. Of contemporary works, there are few that bridge the chasm between fiction and poetry, and even fewer that do so very well. Experimental literature has, I believe, always been on the forefront of every contemporary time period only later to be classified as stylistic bodies of evolving works, “Romanticism,” “Surrealism,” “Transendentalism,” to name a few. When these movements were current, perhaps they had no names, perhaps they were just the next phase of the written word developed by writers who dared ask the question: “What can we try next?” and then proceeded to attempt an answer. Sandy Florian’s work is one such example of the now ambiguous, nameless, 21st-century experimental form. Her works stretch reality, introduce abstract concepts, function subversively, comment on politics and religion, question the...
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Kristina Walsh on Biotech, Radio Shows and The New Wave of Love

In the last post we learned about Kristina Walsh's metaphysical training.  In this post, she talks about the connection between the metaphysical and the physical,  her work as a radio show host, and the new energies of 2013! How does your experience in the biotechnology industry hew to the topics and experiences you explore in the metaphysical? "I started in the biotech field as a temp position, and while I loved the humanitarian aspect of the idea of the industry, I had no idea what I was in for, or that it would have a relation to my clairvoyant life. In 1993, when I started the clairvoyant program at BPI, I had experience with healing and mediation, but not to that degree, but between learning a whole new industry, and having to learn about the science the company was working on, and I got really involved with creating slide presentations among other things. This forced me to ask questions, how to draw cellular...
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Experience, Experience: Kristina Walsh on Clairvoyance, Color, and Psychic Training

In the last post, I introduced Kristina Walsh, biotechnologist, trance medium and SFN Radio host. In this post we'll learn more about Kristina's amazing life experiences and metaphysical training. Can you describe your first clairvoyant experience? How did you feel and what did you do with the information that was given to you? "I would say the first experiences was waking up from a dream or nightmare, and having a knowing that I was okay, and that it was okay to go back to sleep. I was “talked to” in those moments, that it was okay, and I was given tips to try next time I “woke” up in a dream, something like... I can run away from whatever it was after me, or create another dream within the dream in that moment. Other times, I also would wake up in the middle of the night, and I would know there was a presence in the room, and while I felt scared, I...
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