The Art of Letting Go: Laura Jane Walker’s Mixed Media Sculpture

Laura Jane Walker has a visionary approach to art. First, there is an event, something that negates control, like a spilled glass of milk. Freedom comes from the element of surprise, the lack of resistance to the event, the willingness to see what is present. Then, there are the nails, the structure imposed upon the creation, a symbol for that which cannot be changed or transmuted. Static elements, the nails are the guideposts of navigation. Between the event and the structure, thread creates a compositional element, a delicate weaving between fluidity and rigidity, understanding and the understood, what comes easily and what appears as "challenge." How do we navigate through life? What do we deem "good" or "bad"? How solidly do we rely upon structure?  What is required to be flexible with change? And what does it take to remain open in the face of challenge? Is it courage? Perseverance? Love? And what makes these experiences beautiful? Here's what Laura had to say: Many works...
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The Studio of Frank Gonzales

In the heart of Tempe, Arizona, amongst the hurried activity of the nearby university, artist Frank Gonzales makes his home on a quiet street, where his studio provides a sanctuary for creative work. Knowing that environment is important and can impact creative work, he peppers his studio with important items that bring inspiration. Alongside the tubes of paint and jars of paint mixtures, his primary easel sits, facing the window overlooking his sleepy front yard. A terrarium of carnivorous plants sits on the table across from his easel, next to a wide bookcase filled with art and plant books, magazines, and supplies. One of his cats lazily sleeps under another table covered with newly finished works nearly ready to be sent to one of his galleries. Botany and ornithology inform his works; bright, playful paintings that reveal the type of personality that each creature exudes. Most of his pairings are unusual—not necessarily the elements of natural habitat or examples of symbiotic relationships in...
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Infrared: Through the Lens of Photographer Cody Brothers

Photographer Cody Brothers was born in Farmington, New Mexico. After attending West Point Academy and, later, exhibiting works at his first gallery showing in New York City, Brothers decided to devote his time to photography. Inspired by  Dalí, Picasso, El Greco and Paul Strand, his work concentrates on abandoned farms, crumbling homes, neglected churches, aging cemeteries, forgotten cars and other objects, set within the vastness of the southwestern landscape, which he expresses as a narrative of “the western abandon.”  He works almost entirely with infrared film, using a range of different cameras, including a 4 x 5, a hand-made pinhole, and a 6 x 17 panoramic. Shooting pictures in the early-morning or late-afternoon with a black-and-white infrared film is what he enjoys best because of the dreamy effect and the length of the exposure times required to get a great shot. Cody captures his analog frames, then scans and renders each frame as a black-and-white digital chromogenic print. Each print is then typically...
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