A Row of Tombs: Sabine Lucas on Past Lives (Part 1 of 2)

Dr. Sabine Lucas was born in Germany and raised there during the Second World War. She studied German and English language and literature at Heidelberg University. For eleven years,  she instructed undergraduates at Reading University in England in German language and literature while acting part of the time as a German language consultant in the educational programs of BBC London. In the throws of a midlife crisis, she entered a Jungian analysis in London which lasted five years. During this time, she got deeply involved with the many inspiring Jungian events organized for the public by Jungian analysts and theologians in London. This led to a career change and, initially, to a psychotherapy training with the Guild of Psychotherapists in London. After two years of eclectic studies with this experimental group she transferred for a more specialized training to the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. Here she supported herself financially with dream workshops and the German translation of Jane Roberts' Seth Speaks,...
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The Space of the Unknown

The process of creation happens in the present moment. Michelangelo said of his journey as an artist:  “Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it.” Alchemists knew this process well—the act of fashioning “something” from “nothing.” Solve et coagula, that is, "dissolve and coagulate" meaning nothing new can be built before we break the old and we make space. Before a project is revealed, the artist may not (and most likely doesn’t) know what the final work will be.  The artist may have a vague idea about theme, or character, or scene, or tune, but the work reveals itself during the process of creation. It doesn’t happen during a planning phase or a crafting session. The artist, the writer is a channel—one who is willing to go into the space of the unknown, into the space of uncertainty, and be present in that space long enough for the work to reveal...
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Mysticism: Magic? Or Alchemy?

Ideas about magic and alchemy are rooted in ancient and early texts and artwork. The word “magic” is derived from the Greek word mageia, however, mystical and magical systems appear as early as the Babylonians and Egyptian peoples. (Those of you familiar with Lemurian and Atlantean culture know that mysticism appeared during these eras as well.) Early modern ideas and explanations of the esoteric or the unknown have been met with a mixed response of fear and reverie—depending on who was wielding the power to use these mysterious forces. Most documents and much research devoted to the topic of mysticism present a blending of the two. Many texts include information on the Magi, Ancient Greece, Kabbalah and Paganism; there is no discernment between those who practiced magic and those who would be considered “modern mystics.” Some documentation says that magic has its roots in or is closely related to Shamanism, and is associated with power, illusion and trickery. Transformation, however is older...
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